Cedar Creek Publishing​​       A Virginia Publisher of Virginia Books

Sara M. Robinson's selfie with Hobby Robinson's Graflex camera.

Sara Robinson's father, Hobby Robinson, was one of the most important photographers of the 20th century to be so little well-known, at least outside the Shenandoah Valley of central Virginia. He chronicled over three generations of Elkton townsfolk, compiling and self-publishing nine books. Using his vast collection of photographs, his own and those he obtained, he gave us a people and a place. Sometimes the Little Town is Sara's gift of ekphrastic poetry inspired by the portraits in her father's collection. And like her father's work as a photographer, Sara's poetry is a tribute to little towns everywhere.

Poetry  |  Photography  |  History
Regional & Cultural  |  United States - Virginia
Publication Date - February 14, 2016
​ISBN 978-1-942882-04-6  |  Paperback
B&W  |  130 pages  |  7.5 x 9.25  |  $16​​​
Sometimes the
Little Town
by Sara M. Robinson

A loving waltz of poetry and
photographs of mid-twentieth
century life in Elkton, Virginia.

         ~MARTHA H. WOODROOF
                  WMRA Public Radio, Producer of
                  The Spark, Author of Small Blessings
#VABook2017 See Sara Robinson in the Cedar Creek Publishing booth
Sara will be at the #VABook2017 Lit Fair
Cedar Creek Publishing booth!

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to digitize the Hobby Robinson photos

A Cruise in Rare Waters - (Chapbook)

POETRY
ISBN 9780983919292
2013  |  Paperback  |  5-1/2 x 8-1/2
36 pgs  |  B&W  |  $8.00
Poems about Alaska

This chapbook of poems about Alaska, primarily sailing on a cruise ship, dealt a lot with nature, and secondarily with natives to the area. I particularly enjoyed the poems which talked about cold waters -- I could feel the coldness -- and with the color blue. I'm glad that Sara wrote about man's undesirable impact on the glaciers and waters in "Glacial Recession" and towards the end of the poem "A Cruise in Rare Waters." The poem, "On Being in the Wild Place" reminded me of riding on a narrow gauged train many years ago.
                  --Amazon.com review by sallylou61 on April 15, 2014

Two Little Girls in a Wading Pool

In her poem “"Boardwalk,"” Sara Robinson describes, with her usual visual acuity and meditative suppleness, citizens of her beloved Elkton, Virginia, who are “"keepers / of voices who sing of things they are / and things they are not."” What is true of her generously imagined townspeople is true of Robinson herself. In this debut volume, she sings of what she is—keen historian of particular people in a particular place, a little girl growing up into visionary adulthood, sympathetic friend and family member, attentive observer of local flora and fauna, both animal and human—and of what she is not, what is not part of her immediate sensory experience but what nevertheless presents itself abundantly to her capable understanding: eruptions of violence, past and present; other landscapes, domestic and foreign; other selfscapes in people she treats with compassionate dignity. Perceptual traveler, efficient narrator, fearless experimenter, Sara Robinson gives us precious treasure here. 
                  --STEPHEN CUSHMAN - Robert C. Taylor Professor American Literature, Poetry (UVA); Poetry Collections: The Red Line (2014), Riffraf (2011), Heart Island (2006), Cussing Lessons (2002), Blue Pajamas (1998)
POETRY
ISBN 9780983919223
2011  |  Paperback  |  6 x 9
168 pgs  |  B&W  |  $12.00

Stones for Words

NOMINATED FOR THE 18TH  ANNUAL LIBRARY OF VIRGINIA LITERARY AWARD - POETRY

In this second volume of her poems, Sara Robinson has tightened her lines and lightened her touch. What she touches, she touches now with delight, now with humor, now with hard-earned acceptance: a lover s body, a well-iced cocktail, her parents difficult marriage. At many points she speaks of poems, poets, poetry, the words recurring like bits of refrain, testifying to her clear sense of deep vocation. From its short lyrics to the long sequence, Just This Once, Another Once, this book charms and transforms.
                  --STEPHEN CUSHMAN - Robert C. Taylor Professor American Literature, Poetry (UVA); Poetry Collections: The Red Line (2014), Riffraf (2011), Heart Island (2006), Cussing Lessons (2002), Blue Pajamas (1998)
POETRY
ISBN 9780989146531
2014  |  Paperback  |  6 x 9
88 pgs  |  B&W  |  $14.00

SARA M ROBINSON'S BOOKS PUBLISHED BY CEDAR CREEK PUBLISHING

Sara writes the poetry column, “Poetry Matters” for Southern Writers Magazine. Her newest book of poems, Sometimes the Little Town,  was published February 14, 2016 and is based on the photography of Hobby Robinson to complement the new installation of his photos at The Heritage Museum of Harrisonburg and East Rockingham, Virginia. Her other poetry books include, Stones for Words (2014), a 2015 Library of Virginia Literary Award nominee. This volume continues the inner discovery of how she came to write poetry. In her chapbook, A Cruise in Rare Waters (2013) she describes her trip through the inside passage of Alaska and how the spirit of the landscape and people affected her. Her inaugural poetry book, Two Little Girls in a Wading Pool (2012), nominated in 2012 for a Library of Virginia Literary Award, tells of her life experiences growing up in a small town and how she sees the world today in her later years. Her poems have appeared in the online journal of the Poetry Society of Virginia, Piedmont Virginian magazine, Poetica, the Blue Ridge Anthology, the Virginia Literary Journal and others. Her first published work, Love Always, Hobby and Jessie (2009) is a memoir about her famous photographer father, Hobby Robinson, and his marriage to her enigmatic mother. 

Among her appearances are Artist First Radio Network, the Hilda Ward show: Artistic Expressions, WMRA's The Spark, and the Bridgewater International Poetry Festival. She teaches a UVA/OLLI course on Contemporary American Poets, is founder of the Lonesome Mountain Pros(e) Writers Workshop and conducts a weekly poetry group at The Colonnades retirement community. 

Sara M Robinson